The probable cause: a cloud of ash that engulfed her

The probable cause: a cloud of ash that engulfed her

Since the 18th anniversary of the attacks approaches, New York continues to count the amount of those who have developed cancer or other serious illnesses linked to the poisonous cloud that hovered over Manhattan for many weeks. 

The probable cause: a cloud of ash that engulfed her.

“I was there (on) 9/11… For many years I have been working down there every day because 9/11.

Contrary to Febrillet, Richard Fahrer, then 19, was not in the region on 9/11, but he worked as a land surveyor between 2001 and 2003 in south Manhattan, where the Twin Towers came crashing down.

Eighteen months ago, the young father, now 37, was diagnosed with aggressive colon cancer — a disease that normally affects elderly men and which there is not any history of in his loved ones.

Febrillet and Fahrer signify a growing group of individual who were working or living near the World Trade Center in the aftermath of the attacks, which killed almost 3,000 people.

They were not one of the tens of thousands of emergency personnel who rushed to the website or who spent months clearing debris at Ground Zero, but their health has been similarly affected.

Since the 18th anniversary of the attacks approaches, New York continues to count the amount of those who have developed cancer or other serious illnesses linked to the poisonous cloud that hovered over Manhattan for many weeks.

The 9/11 attacks introduced unprecedented levels of chemicals into the atmosphere, such as dioxins, asbestos and other carcinogenic chemicals.

Firefighters, other first responders and volunteers who helped with the months-long cleanup were the first to be changed.

Ten million of them have been diagnosed with cancer from the World Trade Center Health Program, a national treatment program helping survivors.

In the end of June this year, 21,000 individuals not considered first responders were in the program — twice as many as in June 2016. Of these, nearly 4,000 have cancer, the most frequent being prostate, skin and breast.

Febrillet, now 44, is just one of them. She recalls that the message at the time was to get the town back to normal as soon as possible.

“People were just going about their business a couple of days later. But look at what happened a couple of years later, people are dying,” says Febrillet, who lived near Ground Zero.

Fahrer, too, laments that town officials didn’t do more to protect taxpayers and office employees in the area.

I can not say 100 percent, but I do know there might have been better attempts to restrict the exposure of healthy adults from entering the disaster area,” he says.

Health experts say it’s not possible to pinpoint precisely the reason behind cancer in every individual, but note that there’s a clear correlation between the speed and exposure to toxic debris.

Several studies have shown that the cancer rate”has increased between 10 and 30 percent” among people who had been exposed compared to people who were not, David Prezant, New York fire department chief medical officer, told AFP.

The rate is expected to increase further, ” he said, as vulnerable people get older. The risk of cancer increases with age and a number of cancers, including lung, can take 20 to 30 years to grow, Prezant added.

It’s due to this that President Donald Trump signed a bill in July that extends a deadline for victims to file claims for reimbursement from December 2020 to 2090.

The Victim Compensation Fund will be capped up after exhausting its first budget of $7.3 billion. The average compensation per individual is $240,000, or $682,000 for a deceased individual.

Lawyer Matthew Baione, who symbolizes Fahrer and Febrillet in their pursuit of claims, said the expansion realized that it was appropriate to insure someone”who had been a baby during the strikes for the remainder of their life.”

“We’ve lost so many people, so many friends are ill,” says Febrillet

“You get to a point where you aren’t asking,’Have you seen so and so, I wonder how she’s doing, is she retired?’

“Instead you’re asking,’So how is the operation, how is the treatment going?’ We’re so young, this should not be occurring.”

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